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Welcome to 2TheHeart!
 
 
 
"No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted."  -Aesop
 
 
 
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I was so touched by the outpouring of emails from all over the world about my story of Noah and B.B! Thank you to all who wrote - I deeply appreciate your letters and save every one of them and have posted a few of them in today's Letter Box!
 
Today I am happy to share a new story (actually two short stories) by Michael Segal, a 2TheHeart fave! Also, below is a link to a very special poem written by a man who is a gifted poet and is going through a very difficult time. I would like to urge each of our readers to send notes of encouragement and comments on Bruce's poetry in care of my email address. Bruce doesn't have email access, so I would like to surprise him by printing out your letters and mailing them to him in Utah. Please read his poem here: www.2theheart.com/brucemurray and write him to my email address. I know he would be thrilled to have feedback on his very first poetry publication! I hope to add more of his poetry to his page in the future! Have a blessed day.
 
 
 
Just Do The Right Thing
By Michael Segal, MSW
 
            Talking to a co-worker at the hospital on the administration floor, I noticed a perplexed Hispanic woman who was obviously lost. We rushed to the woman and stated "Can we help you?" However, the woman, who was out of breath, could only speak to us in Spanish. Neither my co-worker nor I could speak any Spanish; however, somehow my friend asked, "You need to go to the Eye Center?" and the woman nodded yes.
 
            We were so happy. We thought we had communicated with the woman in distress. (In reality, we should have known that the Hispanic woman could not have understood "You need to go to the Eye Center" as it was obvious to us from the beginning that she could not communicate in English.) I volunteered to take her to the Eye Clinic, located about 200 yards away on a different level.
 
            As we were walking to the Eye Center, the woman was trying vehemently to tell me something. I thought she was trying to thank me for helping her; however, as we got into the elevator I quickly knew that was the furthest thing from her mind.
 
            As the elevator started to descend, I noticed the woman leaning on another woman, screaming and apparently becoming sick. People in the elevator quickly started asking, "Are you OK? What's the matter?" However, I knew the answer to those questions. She was obviously petrified of elevators! Now, I knew, that instead of what I initially thought was her thanking me for sho wing her the way to the Eye Clinic, she was frantically trying to find the way to the stairs. Suddenly, I pressed the button for the next floor and we quickly exited from the elevator. She said, "Gracias," [Spanish for thank you--living in Texas, even I knew that term]. However, my mind raced to another problem: how was she going to get to the Eye Center, or did she now even want to get to the Eye Center?
 
            I asked, "Eye Center?" while pointing to my eyes. She quickly replied, "No, No, No . . . Bambinos [babies]." I thought she meant the Children's Hospital (located in another section of the hospital) but this time I wanted to make sure. 
 
I looked with her for a bilingual employee, and that interpreter told me that she wanted to visit her 5 year old niece, Mary Gonzales, who was sick and on the ninth floor of the Children's Hospital.
 
            Now I knew where she wanted to go, but I also knew she wanted to take the stairs. That meant going down six flights of stairs in one section of the hospital and up nine flights of stairs in another section of the hospital. I found the stairs and we descended all the way to the first level. I then went with her past the cafeteria so she could begin her ascent up the nine flights of stairs in the Children's Hospital.  However, as we approached the stairwell door, it hit me: some floors in the Children's Hospital have locked stairwells from the inside (to prevent kidnappings). That meant I would have to accompany her all the way up nine flights to make sure that she had access on nine.
 
            We climbed, and climbed, and climbed. Finally we got to the stairwell door on nine. I was getting tired. She was getting tired. At least the end was here. I reached for the knob, but I noticed a sign posted on the door: "Floor nine secure. Next access on 10."
 
            I thought to myself, "Oh no . . . not another flight!" as I motioned to her to wait. (For some reason I think she knew what I was about to do.) I went up to 10, took the elevator down to 9, and opened the stairwell door for her. We went to the receptionist on 9 and asked what room Mary Gonzales (her niece) was in. After looking in the computer we were both somewhat shocked with the receptionist's response: "Mary was transferred this morning to another room on the 10th floor, 1063."
 
            I knew what to do. I thanked the receptionist as I showed Mary's aunt back to the stairwell where we had just been a few minutes ago. We climbed one more flight of stairs. Opening the stairwell door on 10 we saw Mary's relatives looking at us in shock. Some of the relatives spoke to Mary's aunt in Spanish. Some of the relatives spoke to me in English: &l dquo;We were so worried. Somehow, we got separated in the hospital and you know, my sister does not like elevators. [I thought: Believe me, now I know.] We looked and looked for a long time, but with no luck. We somehow thought she might be here [on the 10th floor], but we just got here and my sister was nowhere to be found."
 
            I replied, "I'm glad we found ya'll. I hope Mary is feeling better." With that, I descended all the way to one; however, this time I took the elevator, not the stairs.
 
            Yes, climbing those stairs might have caused my heart to r ace a little; however, when we found the family, it was definitely well worth everything.
 
 
            Another example from the hospital was when I saw a 7 year old boy coloring in the Neuro Trauma Intensive Care Unit's Waiting Room. (His mother had been injured in a car accident, sustaining numerous injuries, including a serious traumatic brain injury, and his mother's condition was very serious.) I approached the boy and said, "Wow, you're such a great colorer," in an attempt to cheer the boy up. 
 
          &nb sp; I'll never forget the boy's reply: "Thank you . . . do you want to buy it?"
 
            Startled, I replied, "Well . . . how much is it?"
 
            The boy answered, "Mister, it's right here on the picture," as he showed me the $1.00 price on the top right corner of his picture. Laughing inwardly, I thought, "Now he's a true entrepreneur." That "art" is now proudly displayed on my office wall as I gladly gave the boy a dollar bill.
 
            Sometimes, the smallest things can make all the difference in the world as a "small thing" to the giver can be a "tremendous thing" to the recipient:  returning a wallet to the lost and found; giving a small amount of food to a starving person; or visiting a sick person in the hospital. They are all "small things" but can be huge as they are acts of kindness. Sometimes the "small things" make all the difference in the world, whether it's in a hospital, a supermarket, or anywhere else. Quite often, the "small things" are the right things.
 
©2006 by Michael Segal; all rights reserved
 
Shot in the head during a robbery, Michael Jordan Segal defied all odds by first surviving and then returning to college.  He then earned two degrees with honors, married his high school sweetheart, Sharon, and became a father to his daughter Shawn.  Mike is a social worker at Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston and an author (currently he has two book projects he's working on: an autobiography and an anthology of his short stories).  He also is a very popular inspirational speaker sharing his "recipe" for recovery, happiness, and success.  Please visit his website, www.InspirationByMike.com or call, toll free in the USA/Canada, 1-877-226-1003 for more information.
 
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The Letter Box:
 
 
 
Dear Susan,
 
Such a wonderfully written story--The Insignificant Prayer.  So
glad Noah got B.B. back and that he was in good condition.
The power of prayer is awesome, and I am de lighted that your
ferverant prayers were answered.
 
While it's somewhat useless to speculate, B.B. may have gotten
so far because he was trying to return to your old home territory.
I hope the two-month ordeal will remind him to stay where love
and acceptance will hold him secure.
 
Blessings, Mary-Ellen Grisham "meg"
 
 
 
2TheHeart,
Just wanted to remark on th e story of the Insignificant Prayer, it surely was a touching story of love, kindness and a great heap of faith in prayer and God. It was especially touching to find that one can hope and believe that prayer will be answered. In this case the answered prayer was miraculous. I am so happy for Noah and his family to be able to bring back the softness of this special connection with Noah's special BB. It makes me think that all things are possible with prayer. The story was written very well and truly touched my heart.
 
Thanks so much for sharing your wonderful stories.
Love Francine
 
 
Susan,
Thank you for sharing your miracle with us.  I am so happy for Noah!  This is a beautiful reminder that there is no limit to God's love and what He will do for His children.
God bless,
Karen DeLoach
Statesboro, GA
 
 
Dear Sooz,
I'm in tears ... Thank You ... for reminding me of God's outstanding love for us! 
 
I have been keeping you and your family in my daily prayers ... cat lover, animal lover that I am.  It broke my heart to hear that Noah's c at was missing. 
 
When we moved into our townhouse 18 years ago (we have since moved to our present home) Brittany, silver tabby kitten, disappeared and for days we searched for her and prayed she had not been hit by an auto with a busy street close to our home.  We finally found her huddled back in a corner cabinet in our kitchen.  Always safe, unlike BB, but through the Grace of God she found her way back to you through a new friend. 
 
Noah's right ... WHEW ... is all I can say.  Thank You for sharing this story with all of us. 
 
Take Care ...Love & Hugs,
Carol
 
 
 
Sooz,
Thank you for the wonderful, miraculous story about BB and Noah.  Aren't pets amazing?!  Our dog Foxy is definitely my husband's caregiver.  She keeps him going when nobody else can. 
I wish you and your family well.
Barbara Kramer
Another Angel
 
 
 
Hi Susan,
Welcome back! I am thrilled to be receiving the stories again. This one is absolutely beautiful and a testiment that God always listens to our prayers and they are answered in his time, not ours.
Thanks, Miriam
 
I AM AN 88 YEAR OLD MAN. I HAVE READ SOME WONDERFUL STORIES BEFORE BUT NONE AS HEART TUGGING AS THESE. "GOD WORKS IN MYSTICAL WAYS, HIS WONDERS TO PERFORM." THIS COULDN'T BE MORE TRUE THAN THE LITTLE BOY'S KITTY CAT. I THINK IT GOT TO ME MORE BECAUSE MY BEAUTIFUL OH BLACK A COLE MAMA CAT.
 
NOW AS FOR THE ONE ABOUT THE FARMERS PRAYING FOR RAIN ALSO STRUCK ME DEEPLY. ONE CAN PRAY BUT WITHOUT FAI TH YOU ARE ONLY TALKING TO YOURSELF. I ALWAYS THINK OF THAT SAYING "WISDOM OUT OF THE MOUTHS OF BABES".
 
THANKS AGAIN FOR THE WONDERFUL STORIES AND I WILL BE SURE TO WATCH FOR YOUR POSTINGS EACH DAY NOW. WITH ALL MY LOVE FOR YOUR WORKS. I KNOW THAT GOD IS YOUR INSPIRATION.
YOUR OLD FRIEND, LES
 
 
What a beautiful testimony to the power of prayer, and the Lord's care for His little ones. I am soo touched! God bless you and all praying mothers.
Mary
 
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Making a difference, one story at a time!
 
 
    Making a difference, one story at a time!